UFOs in the Hudson River Valley

by Charles Lear

The Phoenix Lights is a classic case among UFOlogists and one of those where you quote the date (March 13, 1997) when mentioning it if you want to impress upon your fellows that you know your subject.  It involves a night of sightings by thousands of Arizona residents, including Governor Fife Symington, of a huge V-shaped craft that was defined by lights on it edges and blocked out stars as it passed.  It made national news and became the subject of the 2009 television movie, “I know What I Saw.”  The case was explained away as being a misidentified military flare drop, which happened two hours after the sightings reports.  The flare drop was localized, while the reported craft was said to travel across the entire state and, despite the incongruity, enough of the public accepted the explanation that the case was able to fade into history.

Similar sightings of huge V-shaped craft by thousands of witnesses along the Hudson River Valley occurred in the early 1980’s.  This was not just over a single night but over a period of years and should have overshadowed the Phoenix Lights in UFOlogical circles, but many don’t even know where the Hudson Valley is let alone that there was a fascinating series of sightings there which are being investigated to this day.  Even now there is still activity in the small area town of Pine Bush that holds a yearly UFO fair.  To give you an idea where the HRV is located, the Hudson River meets the ocean just past New York City.  The valley runs north up to Albany with New York State to the west. Read more

Blog: A Brief Guide To UFO Related Groups

by Michael Lauck

mufonSince the modern age of unidentified flying object incidents began in 1947, many organizations dedicated to the phenomena have formed (and disbanded). It can be a bit confusing to sort out the alphabet soup of UFO group acronyms, so this article attempts to introduce some of the most commonly encountered international organizations both past and present. If the group is currently active then online contact information is provided. All sites are in English except for the brief list of worldwide organizations at the end of the article.

APRO (Aerial Phenomena Research Organization): Founded by Jim and Coral Lorenzen in 1952, APRO was active until 1988. Based out of Arizona, APRO focused on using scientific techniques to investigate reports of unidentified flying objects. Dr. James E. McDonald, physicist and professor at the University of Arizona, Tucson, was one of several PhD level scientists that consulted with the group. APRO was involved with both the Travis Walton and Paul Bennewitz cases.
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