UFOs in the Hudson River Valley

by Charles Lear

The Phoenix Lights is a classic case among UFOlogists and one of those where you quote the date (March 13, 1997) when mentioning it if you want to impress upon your fellows that you know your subject.  It involves a night of sightings by thousands of Arizona residents, including Governor Fife Symington, of a huge V-shaped craft that was defined by lights on it edges and blocked out stars as it passed.  It made national news and became the subject of the 2009 television movie, “I know What I Saw.”  The case was explained away as being a misidentified military flare drop, which happened two hours after the sightings reports.  The flare drop was localized, while the reported craft was said to travel across the entire state and, despite the incongruity, enough of the public accepted the explanation that the case was able to fade into history.

Similar sightings of huge V-shaped craft by thousands of witnesses along the Hudson River Valley occurred in the early 1980’s.  This was not just over a single night but over a period of years and should have overshadowed the Phoenix Lights in UFOlogical circles, but many don’t even know where the Hudson Valley is let alone that there was a fascinating series of sightings there which are being investigated to this day.  Even now there is still activity in the small area town of Pine Bush that holds a yearly UFO fair.  To give you an idea where the HRV is located, the Hudson River meets the ocean just past New York City.  The valley runs north up to Albany with New York State to the west. Read more

Dr. James E. McDonald and the UFO Problem

by Charles Lear

By coincidence, two UFOlogists who studied mass sightings by school children ended up dying an untimely death.  One was John E. Mack, an Ariel School sighting researcher who was hit by a truck in London in 2004 and the other was James E. McDonald who researched the Westall sighting in Australia and took his own life in 1971 in Tucson, Arizona.  Both were reputable scientists with careers in psychiatry and meteorology respectively and both suffered attacks on their credibility due to their pursuit of UFOlogy.  Due to different public attitudes towards UFO research during their times, Mack was able to withstand an investigation by the Dean of Harvard Medical School which threatened his position there and write best-selling books on the abduction phenomenon, whereas McDonald endured multiple threats to his career, funded his own research without book deals and was publicly humiliated at a congressional hearing.  Still reeling from this he received the blow of his wife’s request for a divorce, which seems to have led to his suicide.

McDonald, born May 7, 1920, was one of very few scientists of his time who were willing to go on the record and advocate for the extra-terrestrial hypothesis as an explanation for UFOs.  He had a PhD from Iowa State University, taught at the University of Chicago and then the University of Arizona where he helped establish a meteorological and atmospherics program.  His interest in UFOs started with his own sighting in 1954 while driving in Arizona with two other meteorologists.  What was seen was a less than dramatic distant point of light but the fact that three scientists who specialized in atmospheric observation were unable to identify it signaled to McDonald that there was a need for a focus on “the UFO problem” by the scientific community.  He began investigating on his own and joined the National Investigations Committee on Aerial Phenomenon.  After interviewing between 150 to 200 witnesses from 1956 to 1966 in his home area of Tucson, Arizona he was, in his own words,”far from overwhelmed with the importance of the UFO problem.”  His attitude would change in 1966, sparked by a sense of betrayal felt by himself and many other investigators, witnesses, and members of the general public.  This was brought on by the growing realization that the U.S. Air Force investigation into UFOs had become nothing more than a public relations campaign designed to downplay and debunk as many incidents as possible. Read more

290. Free Show: Donald Schmitt & Allis Druffel

Subscribe to our full two-hour shows for two dollars per month or more.  Pre-recorded face to face interviews with Donald Schmitt, which is a heartfelt interview about J. Allen Hynek and more, then in hour two, Allis Druffel discusses what it was like growing up with her iconic mother, UFO researcher, Ann Druffel and also talks about her mother’s close connection to James E. McDonald which led to her authoring the book: Firestorm. This show is dedicated to Craig R. Lang, MUFON Experiencer Researcher

Show Notes

233. Free Show: Ray Stanford

Alejandro Rojas with the news, guest Ray Stanford discusses his $2 million UFO detection facility in the 1970s, his 1980 Tizayuca multi-object encounter along with many other filmed encounters, he also invites serious researchers to his home, and speaks about the Socorro Incident and more.  HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Show Notes

147. Ray Stanford

Ray Stanford on CNN (Edt)Alejandro Rojas with the news, and Ray Stanford talks about various amazing UFO phenomena footage with various scientific implications that peaked Dr Leik Myrabo interest that may change space travel and more.
Support the show to listen to a great segment with Ray talking about Socorro 51 years ago, plus the scientists interested in his findings and who the next guardian of his material could be. Get his book through the:

Show Notes

 

 

Blog: Officer Lonnie Zamora and “The Socorro Case”

 by Michael Lauck

The+Socorro+UFO+IncidentOn the evening of April 24, 1964 Socorro, New Mexico police officer Lonnie Zamora drove to the scene of what he believed to be a dynamite shack explosion. Instead of an accidental explosion he found an object which he described as an oval shaped device with a red insignia and two people in white overalls nearby. When the object began to emit flame from underneath Zamora retreated to behind his squad car, fearing an explosion. After taking shelter he saw the object lift off and managed to call in to the station as it roared off. The Socorro Case was investigated by Dr. J. Allen Hynek for Project Blue Book and was officially listed as “Unidentified.” Recently it has been alleged that students from New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology were behind the incident, but this explanation is controversial.

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